The relationship between jim casy and tom joad in the novel the grapes of wraith

In his novel, The Grapes of Wrath, John Steinbeck brings a variety of diverse characters to the reader.

The relationship between jim casy and tom joad in the novel the grapes of wraith

SparkNotes: The Grapes of Wrath: Chapters 4–6

When we first meet him, he is still struggling with these concepts, but is beginning to narrow them down to an earthy interpretation of Emerson's theory of the Oversoul: All souls are just a small portion of a larger soul, this larger soul being the "Holy Sperit the human sperit.

There's just stuff people do. It's all part of the same thing. Specifically, he shares his theories with Tom, who is an impatient, but not unwilling listener. At various points, Casy's teachings reflect the various philosophies of transcendentalism, humanism, socialism, and pragmatism.

Jim Casy is the moral spokesman of the novel and is often considered a Christ-figure.

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The initials of his name, J. In Christ-like fashion, Casy sacrifices himself when he turns himself in to save Tom after an altercation with a deputy. Prior to this point in the novel, Jim has been primarily a speaker, more worried about figuring things out than acting on his ideas.

His sacrifice for Tom marks the first time that Casy acts. For his sacrifice, Casy in put in jail, where his experiences with the positive effects of group organization lead him to a more complete realization of his beliefs. He leaves jail and begins to put his theories into practice.

He dies a martyr's death, paraphrasing Christ's last words "Forgive them, Father, for they know not what they do" when he cries, "You don' know what you're a-doin. Tom, who must be considered Casy's disciple, vows to spread his message as he works toward greater social justice.Tom and Casy find the Joad homestead strangely untouched, other than a section of the farmhouse that has been crushed.

How does Granpa Joad die?

The presence of usable materials and tools on the premises, apparently unscavenged, signifies to Tom that the neighbors, too, must have deserted their farms.

Tom and Casy see Muley Graves walking toward them. Jim Casy is the moral spokesman of the novel and is often considered a Christ-figure. The initials of his name, J.C., are the same as Jesus Christ, and like Christ, he wanders in the wilderness.

In Christ-like fashion, Casy sacrifices himself when he turns himself in to save Tom after an altercation with a deputy.

The relationship between jim casy and tom joad in the novel the grapes of wraith

While many have long believed that Jim Casy embodied Steinbeck's main philosophical beliefs, Tom Joad, completely flawed and human, is the novel's main character. Tom is the character who shows the most development, experiencing what Peter Lisca calls an "education of the heart.".

The Awakening of Tom Joad in Grapes of Wrath Grapes of Wraith by John Steinbeck portrayed the awakening of a man's conscience dealing with his troubling trials throughout the novel. Read this Social Issues Essay and over 89, other research documents.

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Start studying Grapes of Wrath. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. Search. contrast between jim and casey? (ch.4) tom=man of action -Tom and Casy see that the Joad house has been pushed off its foundations.

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