Essay on downsizing prisons

This is one reason why many excellent companies do everything possible to avoid layoffs.

Essay on downsizing prisons

October 29, Auto Parts Workers Rally Across Ontario CAW members in more than auto parts workplaces took part in a series of lunchtime demonstrations outside their plants during a province-wide day of action on October The protest was the culmination of months of planning and involved 15, workers across Ontario.

Parts workers called for a stop to the downward pressure on working conditions, employer demands for severe contract give-backs and demanded greater respect for work ownership, including the right to follow work in the event it is relocated to other facilities — with the collective agreement in tact.

CAW President Ken Lewenza told a crowd of demonstrators in the parking lot of Burlington Technologies that cutting the wages and benefits of workers will not solve the uncertainty facing the parts industry. Lewenza highlighted that demands on parts workers for concessions are not limited to unionized shops, as non-unionized workers often face much more severe cutbacks.

In Canada, approximately 20, parts workers are union members while about 40, to 45, are not. Lewenza urged government to introduce fairer unionization legislation, which would see Essay on downsizing prisons check certification reinstated in the province. He also lambasted the government for allowing employers Essay on downsizing prisons use replacement workers during labour disputes and touched on the need to introduce fair severance and bankruptcy legislation.

This large-scale effort organized under the campaign Auto Parts Workers United, also included a massive outreach effort to non-unionized parts workers, including those employed by Magna. For more information on the campaign or the Day of Action, please visit: In the statement, passed on October 15, the union expresses its grave concern about the bullying of LGBT teens and urges renewed vigilance against all forms of bullying, including jokes, slurs, harassment, threats and any form of violent behaviour.

We must keep up this fight until each and every one of us can enjoy equal liberty, mobility and respect, to live openly with our families and loved ones in dignity. The union is in first contract negotiations with McIntosh, Air Cab and Aaroport, after being certified as the official bargaining agent in early February.

All three companies are owned by the same individual. The drivers are represented by CAW Local The union is attempting to end a number of unethical practices such as drivers being forced to purchase both their car and insurance from the company owner at a marked up price.

The simulations suggest an incremental loss of between 28, andCanadian jobs. A free trade agreement would make that imbalance worse, Stanford argues.

The report comes on the heels of a fifth round of Canada-EU trade talks in Ottawa, which wrapped up on October 22, and the first major public demonstration against the trade deal.

Demonstrations are being held at more than workplaces in Ontario including Toronto, Windsor and Brampton. The union says companies are demanding concessions despite the fact the industry is expected to turn a profit next year, according to a report by the Conference Board of Canada in August.

Union leaders say auto-parts workers are not prepared to give up more of their wages and benefits, or accept a proposed two-tier wage system for new hires. But he had help, lots of it, to put Ford on the verge of becoming the world's most profitable automaker, starting with a board of directors led by an executive chairman whose name is stamped on every Blue Oval worldwide.

That's huge, arguably even more than the backing of the Ford family itself. What could the Ford family diaspora do in the dark days of or the even darker days of '08 and '09 — peddle their stakes to would-be buyers at the lowest valuations in their lifetimes and risk losing control of the company?

Corporate directors have choices, though: Or they can stand up, do their jobs and force a change in direction by hiring someone who will lead the change, and then back him up.

They understood that the revolving executive doors atop the Glass House left them with few viable inside candidates to replace Bill Ford, that the company needed a CEO hardened by tough industrial restructuring, that the new guy would need billions of dollars to finance a turnaround certain to include cutting jobs, jettisoning brands and shaking the company to its core.

They faced what their rivals at then-General Motors Corp. Which is why Ford is on track to be one of the greatest industrial turnarounds this country has ever seen and GM is doing it the harder way.

GM gutted through bankruptcy and emerged as a ward of the federal government. It is preparing to launch an initial public offering, led by its fourth CEO in less than two years. Because GM's former directors refused to make the tough choices, to find the right leaders, that Ford did. Way back in '07, when GM was agreeing to fund hefty increases in pension payments for the United Auto Workers, Mulally would stand at his window in the northeast corner of Ford headquarters, point in the direction of the Rouge complex and say something like: In 10 years, this could all be gone.

He'd tell Ford marketers and engineers that the company had been going out of business for 25 years. He'd argue unspeakable heresy — that Ford didn't need to be in the global luxury car business, that it didn't need to own a third of Mazda Motor Corp.

In each case, he'd be right. In each case, the Ford logic he probed didn't make business sense. In each case, the outsider gone inside voiced conclusions echoing those from critical employees, outside analysts and media hacks who were routinely dismissed by company officials.

And in each case, the directors backed the new guy because they knew he was right — Ford had to change or it would die. They approved his once-unthinkable moves, funded product plans and backed his management team assembled mostly from longtime Ford hands.Read this essay on Prison Downsizing.

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Prison Downsizing Implementation in New York State Darlene R. Muller Prison-Industrial Complex (PIC) is an interaction that shares interest of all who helps expand the prison system for personal profits, from monetary profits, political.

Essay on downsizing prisons

PARC corresponds with and mails a directory of these resources to prisoners, their friends and family members. We are often the first point of contact for people to connect with prisoners' rights organizations, community organizations, prison literature and arts projects, family and visiting resources, health care and legal resources, parole and pre-release resources, and the prison abolition.

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28, , p.m. (CT), to discuss the life and legacy of Tom Hayden. Listen to the podcast here. It’s an issue that has divided the mental health community to a rare extent. For its advocates, it’s a humane alternative to leaving people to deteriorate to the .

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Essay on downsizing prisons

Established in This is a research site with the history of the wars, costs, failed strategies, lies, ignorance and arrogance which are bankrupting America and undermining our Republic.

Downsizing - Research Paper